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The Orient Express (only for those who have already read it)

LukeMcLArenLukeMcLAren Greece Investigator
I have just finished reading the Orient Express and I felt a slight disappointment when it came to the end. However I still think that it is a marvelous book. The reason i felt disappointed is because normally Hercule Poirot is on justice's side and no matter what the conditions were he condemns the murderer. This time however he doesn't. I suppose justice was that he should be stabbed, considering what he had done. Have you watched the David Suchet documentary on the Orient Express? You should...
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Comments

  • But here's the thing, we don't know which blow from the stabbing was the one that killed Ratchett. It could have been the first blow, the second, maybe the seventh blow. So yes, they all had the motive to murder Ratchett but as to which blow killed him . . . . we don't know. Maybe Poirot decided to let them all go because he felt compassion for them; he must have felt that Ratchett so affected these victims and on top of that he was involved in the death of a child, that letting them go would be the right thing to do, considering what they went through. BUT still, would that be justice? Because in the end, they all came with a motive and intent to kill Ratchett and no matter if we don't know which blow killed him, should they still be held responsible just for the motive and committing the act of stabbing someone alone? 


    “People in the dark are quite different, aren’t they?”  ― A Murder Is Announced 
  • GriseldaGriselda ✭✭✭✭
    I wonder if Agatha Christie's views altered as she grew older. I note that in the earlier works the author allows a certain  generosity in her presentation of those who interpret the law and the reporting of the crimes. SPOILER - in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, the police are going to fix it so Sheppard's sister suffers no shame: his culpability won't be publicised. In Murder at the Vicarage, Inspector Slack gives himself credit for solving the crime: he doesn't write in his notes that Miss Marple fed him the solution. I sense the true crime giving the idea for Murder on the Orient Express - was it the pilot Lyndburgh's baby?  was so shocking to all the public in every country, even to Agatha Christie, that it forced her to imagine revenge with the pen and her passion. Arguably, her feelings gave her that denouement to the novel.  Older a tougher, perhaps, she is rather harder on the young Elvira in At Bertram's Hotel. Only a child, really. She was bad to shoot the doorman. Her mother had made her bad, you could argue, through her self-centred neglect of her. Did Miss Marple really have to reveal the true criminal when the mother had tried to undo the past by taking the rap and then killing herself? As she aged, we see a different attitude not only to personalities, but maybe to her role as a storyteller, too.  Not just entertainer, but maybe Nemesis herself, in later years, giving her damning verdict on the young of the 1960s, and how their attitudes had been changing society for the worse.
  • You're right Griselda, Murder On The Orient Express was inspired by the events that occurred with the death of Charles Lindbergh's son which occurred in 1932. And to add onto that tragedy, the maid that was employed by the family was under great suspicion of the Lindbergh's child's death and later committed suicide.  


    “People in the dark are quite different, aren’t they?”  ― A Murder Is Announced 
  • GriseldaGriselda ✭✭✭✭
    So there are very clear similarities. The story must really have played on AC's mind.I wonder if other members of the household were under suspicion at the time - in the real life tragedy?
  • GriseldaGriselda ✭✭✭✭
    I know I've said this before, but do you think there are many people who would watch the film and not know the story? I knew the ending before I read the book, and before that, I think I joined the original film half way through, so I saw all the characters and palava before I knew who it was who had been done in. If you didn't know the ending, would it be interesting to wonder who did it - I suppose it would, guessing who could be the child's parents.
  • Tommy_A_JonesTommy_A_Jones Gloucestershire, United Kingdom ✭✭✭✭✭
    I had a Puzzle book and he ending was the answer to a Question.
  • GriseldaGriselda ✭✭✭✭
    I found it interesting to read the WIKI page for Murder on the Orient Express. It describes journeys on the Orient Express which influenced Christie to write the novel, and it has some interesting snippets, such as the information that David Suchet had suggested that directors introduce religious elements into the adaptations of the novels.
  • Tommy_A_JonesTommy_A_Jones Gloucestershire, United Kingdom ✭✭✭✭✭
    I always thought he had too much say in the Adaptations
  • AgathasmykidAgathasmykid British Columbia, Canada ✭✭✭
    I remember the first time I read it, (I was much younger at the time), not being frustrated about Poirot's ethics, but was very frustrated that there wasn't one clear cut murderer!

    As I have grown older I have come to appreciate what Agatha was doing, so much so that Orient is my favorite AC book, but I do think it would be fun to speculate about if Agatha had gone the one murderer route, who it might have been.
  • As I have grown older I have come to appreciate what Agatha was doing, so much so that Orient is my favorite AC book, but I do think it would be fun to speculate about if Agatha had gone the one murderer route, who it might have been.
    Well if Agatha Christie did go the one murderer route who do you think it could have been? Since she didn't take that route, which stab wound do you think was the fatal blow that killed Mr. Ratchett? 


    “People in the dark are quite different, aren’t they?”  ― A Murder Is Announced 
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