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homosexuality

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Comments

  • jenniferjennifer Investigator
    I just reread Three Act Tragedy too.  I noticed that very part of the story!  Had a chuckle.  I really liked the character Egg.  
  • @jennifer, I always wonder about her. I mean, do you think she really fell in love with the aging actor, or was it just a serious crush? Her mother obviously was for it, but she had her own Victorian way of looking at the world. The actor himself, whom you might have thought would be the one to really develop a serious crush on the pretty young, vivacious girl, actually just uses her in his plot... You'd expect the modern girl to be a bit more blase where the actor is concerned. But no. She has her growing up to do... I thought AC was showing us that one could be "modern" and yet immature.
  • vazinvazin Shkoder, Albania Investigator
    i didnt check the novels butin  the adaptation ( i mean the TV episodes) of "cards on the table" and "five little bigs"
    there are homosexual characters
  • RayRay Appleton, Wisconsin Fan
    In Nemesis Clotilde (a 'mannish' woman) kills Verity (a young attractive girl) rather than let her run away with a man. Miss Marple compares Clotilde and Verity's relationship to that of a husband and wife, saying she suspected Clotilde because you always suspect the husband. I think this was AC's most direct allusion to same gender attraction.
  • As for Nemesis, in the book there is no hint that Clotilde is sexually attracted to Verity - rather that after having adopted her, she sees her as a daughter, her perfect daughter whom she cannot bear to let go. This is a recurring theme: See also "The clock strikes twelve" by Patricia Wentworth, which was published 27 years earlier. There an elderly woman, also unmarried like Clotilde, has adopted a baby girl. Now that the girl is grown up, she does everything in her power to keep her to herself, starting by breaking up her marriage, and ending... well, you can read it. Another example (this time with a "real" = biological mother): the mockingbird for hallmark movie "Mother knows best" (1997).
  • Nemesis (along with "The Clock Strikes Twelve") deals with an unhealthy kind of love, where love could go when taken to the extreme -- obsessive love. It's a theme that Christie often explored throughout her career but in Nemesis she shows how far and dark it could get. A flawed book but beyond that it's one of Christie's finest of her later books.


    “People in the dark are quite different, aren’t they?”  ― A Murder Is Announced 
  • Nemesis (along with "The Clock Strikes Twelve") deals with an unhealthy kind of love, where love could go when taken to the extreme -- obsessive love. It's a theme that Christie often explored throughout her career but in Nemesis she shows how far and dark it could get. A flawed book but beyond that it's one of Christie's finest of her later books.

    Yes, the element of the over controlling or over-obsessed parent or guardian appears in "Ordeal by Innocence", and in the story "The herb of death". Unfortunately, this is a situation that happens, in different variations, in real life.
  • OpheliaOphelia Nowhere Fan
    Mr. Shatterwaite (not sure this is how it’s spelled in English)
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