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Agatha Christie and Irish people!

Does anyone, other than me feel that Agatha Christie is bit prejudiced against Irish people in her writings ?
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  • Does anyone, other than me feel that Agatha Christie is bit prejudiced against Irish people in her writings ?
    Can you give specific examples? I found prejudice against Jews, Latins and middle-europeans.
  • ashunigionashunigion Kolkata Fan
    There are certain remarks, that i found in One, Two Buckle my shoe, Sad cypress and Evil under the Sun. I cant really recollect the exact excerpt. I am confident that in my next novel I am will find such remark, then I will quote them here. ;)  
  • taliavishay-arbeltaliavishay-arbel ✭✭✭✭
    edited October 24
    There are certain remarks, that i found in One, Two Buckle my shoe, Sad cypress and Evil under the Sun. I cant really recollect the exact excerpt. I am confident that in my next novel I am will find such remark, then I will quote them here. ;)  
    From "One, two, buckle my shoe":

     “Well, Irishmen have hot tempers and they thoroughly enjoy a row of any kind. Mr. Reilly liked arguing about politics.”

    From "Sad Cypress":

    "I was going to ask you to give me your impressions of the two nurses."

     "Well, O'Brien's Irish, good nurse, competent, a bit silly, could be spiteful, a bit of a liar - the imaginative kind that's not so much deceitful, but just has to make a good story out of everything."

    From "A Murder is Announced":

    "He could have shot her from behind a hedge in the good old Irish fashion any day of the week, and probably got away with it."

    From "Curtain":

    "Rather an amusing thing happened once with a batman of mine. Irish chap. He had a holiday and went off to Ireland for it. When he came back, I asked him if he had had a good holiday.

     "'Ah shure, your Honour, best holiday I've ever had in my life!'

     "'I'm glad of that,' I said, rather surprised at his enthusiasm.

     "'Ah yes, shure, it was a grand holiday! I shot my brother.'"

    From "Third Girl":

     “Perhaps there may not have been blood in the courtyard. Perhaps it is only what an imaginative Irish porter imagined.”

    On the positive side, from the Autobiography:

    "Elsie was rather Irish; she had dark hair, blue eyes, curls, and was gay and laughed a good deal." 

    And in "M or N":

    "She might, he thought, be Irish, though she had no brogue. But it would account for the vitality and the exuberance."

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